1D Motion

Grade/Subject:   11/Physics                 Unit:      Kinematics        

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES

General Learning Outcomes:

Students will describe motion in terms of displacement, velocity, acceleration and time.

Students will compose, revise and edit text.

Students will use technology to investigate and/or solve problems

Specific Learning Outcomes:

define, qualitatively and quantitatively, displacement, velocity and acceleration

define, operationally, and compare and contrast scalar and vector quantities

explain, qualitatively and quantitatively, uniform and uniformly accelerated motion when provided with written descriptions and numerical and graphical data

CTS:

use advanced word processing menu features to accomplish a task; for example, insert a table, graph or text from another document

Continue to demonstrate the outcomes achieved in prior grades and course subjects

use appropriate communication technology to elicit feedback from others

4.3 manipulate data by using charting and graphing technologies in order to test inferences and probabilities

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • Analyze a set of data points
  • Create a set of graphs describing movement
  • Create a lab report with tables of data and images

ASSESSMENTS

Observations:

Periodically check as students

Key Questions

How can we find velocity from position? How can we find acceleration?

Why might we want to

Written/Performance Assessments 

 

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED

Resource #1: Physics textbook

Resource #2: Icebreakers http://www.teaching.utoronto.ca/gsta/teachingtopics/ice-breakers.htm

 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

PROCEDURE

Introduction:

 
Hook/Attention Grabber:Assessment of Prior Knowledge:

Draw a maze on the board: What’s the shortest path to the end?

Have students think about it, then draw a line from start to finish! Who said you had to stay in the lines!?

Expectations for Learning and Behaviour:

Today we will have a lab outside. If you need to get things from your locker, please do so now. Once we start we must stay together as a group.

Transition to Body:

Let’s practice handout out these sheets and see if we can beat our previous record!

Body:

Learning Activity #1:

Double Bingo! Students must complete the bingo chart by meeting everyone in the class. One side has names, and the other side has things like “has more than 2 siblings”. Once 3 students get bingos then the game stops.

Learning Activity #2:

Run from point A to point B however you like. (give example of going fast, then slow, then back then forward.

Measure out points ever 5 meters and station a student with a stop watch. Have another student film the movement on an iPad.

Students will then meet back in the classroom and we will combine the data into a table. Students then draw a position time graph, a velocity time graph and an acceleration time graph.

Tomorrow we will do this again, and see if you can recreate a run from the data!

Assessments/Differentiation:

Students who are not comfortable working in groups on this assignment may work on their own.

Learning Activity #3:Work Period

Students may check out an iPad to create their lab reports. Reports should include graphs, data and images where applicable.

 

Closure:     

 
Consolidation/Assessment of Learning:

Tomorrow we will grade our lab reports. Please make sure they have the following:

Data chart

Graphs

Explanations

Feedback from Students:

 Socrative quiz

Feedback to Students:

Comments on the lab. What went really well and what things need to be practiced in the future.

Transition to Next Lesson

This is our last day of the review section. We will now jump into the new and exciting world of kinematics! Remember to go unto the website and complete the next lesson.

Sponge activity

http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/maze-game

 

 

http://www.edc.gov.ab.ca/ict/pofs.asp 

Displacement, Vectors and Scalars lesson plan

Grade/Subject:  11/Physics 20                  Unit:     Kinematics              

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES

General Learning Outcomes:

Students will describe motion in terms of displacement, velocity, acceleration and time.

Specific Learning Outcomes:

20-A1.2k define, operationally, and compare and contrast scalar and vector quantities

20-A1.1k define, qualitatively and quantitatively, displacement, velocity and acceleration

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • Experiment with the differences between speed and velocity
  • Sort vector and scalar quantities
  • Build a community in the classroom

ASSESSMENTS

Observations:

Find percentage of students who have completed the online portion.

Key Questions

What is the difference between distance and displacement? How can you find displacement? When might we prefer to know this over distance?

Written/Performance Assessments 

Pop quiz: List your username for the flipped classroom.

Did you attempt the first quiz? Yes? 5pts.

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED

Resource #1:

Learn Alberta: Average Speed as a Weighted Average 

Resource #2:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbrEBpCw3Ag 

Resource #3:

Flipped Classroom

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

  • Simulation page pre-loaded
  • Smart board/projector
  • Distance devices.

PROCEDURE

Introduction:

 
Hook/Attention Grabber:Assessment of Prior Knowledge:

Play the Vector clip from Disney’s Despicable Me.

Expectations for Learning and Behaviour:

Here is a review of our class expectations. Before we start, let’s put these up on the wall.

Advance Organizer/Agenda:

Today we are going to experiment with vectors and scalars and begin exploring the differences between displacement, velocity and acceleration.

Transition to Body:

But before we do… pull out a sheet of paper and answer this pop quiz!

Pop quiz: List your username for the flipped classroom.

Did you attempt the first quiz? Yes? 5pts.

 

Body :

Learning Activity #1: Community building – Snowball fight

Everyone take out a sheet of paper. Write down two questions you would be willing to answer in front of the class. Do not write your name on the sheet yet. You have 2 min to think about what you would like to write.

Now… crumple it up. On the count of three we will have a 30 second snowball fight. Whatever one you end up with you will answer at least one of the questions. Ready? Go!

Form a circle at the back and share. Remember to share your names.

Assessments/Differentiation:

Learning Activity #2:

Experiment:

Average speed vs weight widget.

Displacement vs distance widget

Before each move, have table groups come up with their estimate.

 

Assessments/Differentiation:

 

Learning Activity #3: Lab

Mission: Find the distance from our classroom to the gym. Find the displacement. How can you find displacement? Why are they different. After you have collected your information, you may use the rest of class to finish the lab report.

 

Assessments/Differentiation:

View lab reports to see the depth of understanding of these important topics.

Closure:     

 
Consolidation/Assessment of Learning:

The information in this section, though still a review of science 10, is critical to your success in this course. Please remember to go onto our class website tonight and complete the next unit.

Feedback from Students:

Poll everywhere: What is the difference between distance and displacement. What could make this classroom better for you?

Feedback to Students:

Comments about group performance and changes that are needed.

Transition to Next Lesson

Be sure to complete the online lesson. Tomorrow we will end our review of these concepts with graphs and 1D motion.

 

 

First day + Intro to vectors and scalars

 

Grade/Subject:   11/Physics 20                 Unit:   Kinematics        

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES

General Learning Outcomes:

Students will describe motion in terms of displacement, velocity, acceleration and time.

C.5 – Students will use technology to aid collaboration during inquiry

Specific Learning Outcomes:

20-A1.2k define, operationally, and compare and contrast scalar and vector quantities

4.2 Participate in a variety of electronic group formats

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • Students will sort vector and scalar elements into their correct categories.
  • Students will differentiate between scalar and vector definitionsStudents will get to know one another and start to build a classroom community.
  • Students will sign up for the online classroom and post to the forum.

ASSESSMENTS

Observations:

Observe which students have difficulty participating.

Are students willing to participate in a blended or flipped environment?

Key Questions

What is the difference between a vector and a scalar? Can you give an example?

Written/Performance Assessments 

Not applicable

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED

Resource #1:

Ice-breakers: Getting to Know Your Class

Resource #2:

Alberta program of studies 

Resource #3:

Flipped Physics 20 

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

  • Smart board
  • Internet connection

PROCEDURE

Introduction:

 
Hook/Attention Grabber:Assessment of Prior Knowledge:

Meet each student at the door and shake their hand. Once the bell goes, shoot the tin can monkey with the air gun from across the room.

Expectations for Learning and Behaviour:

Welcome to the first day of school. My name is Mr. Kocher and this is physics 20. I’m excited to share with you the wonders that science, especially physics, has to offer.

Advance Organizer/Agenda:

This semester we will learn all about motion and how we can predict it. But before we get into that, lets spend some time getting to know one another and coming up with some classroom objectives.

Transition to Body:

Launch the smart board agenda outline with instructions for the first game. 

Body:

Learning Activity #1: Mnemonics Game

For this assignment I need everyone to take out a sheet of paper.

Take about 1 min and think of a way that people could remember your name. Michael Michael motorcycle? Or some very unique thing to you. For example, you can remember my name by thinking of a can of coke. Maybe you would even picture a can of coke with a big nose on it! Anything you can feel comfortable sharing with the class.

Step 2. Introduce yourself to the people at your table group. Share with them your mnemonic and go around the table until you feel that you figured them all out. 5 min for this activity.

Step 3. We will form a circle in the back. Each one of us will share our mnemonic and either our favorite food or our favorite hobby.

 

Assessments/Differentiation:  Explane that if a student is not comfortable they have the right to pass. Just say pass and we move along.

 

Learning Activity #2: Classroom expectations

A great learning environment needs some expectations so it can flow smoothly. As the weeks go on we may adjust these, but for now, why don’t we brainstorm some rules?

Points to include in class discussion:

  • Respect
  • Cell phones
  • Homework and extra help
  • Types of projects preferred
  • Amount of homework load and flexibility
  • Leaving the classroom
  • etc

As students come up and agree to expectations, add these to the smart board and rearrange them as needed.

Discuss with students the signals I will give. For example, when I put my hand up it means finish your sentence, and eyes on me.

Learning Activity #3:

Before I send you away, let me explain how this class will operate. This class is a blended classroom. Some called it a flipped classroom. What this means is that you will do your homework problems and projects in class! Rather than doing practice problems at home, you will watch a short video clip and answer a few questions.

<show students the website and how to create an account>

Please take an iPad from the cart. As you take the iPad, sign your name beside the number that’s on the bottom of the iPad. We will now create an account on the blended website, and if time let you complete the first lesson.

  • create an account at kocher.co and use your school ID.

For homework:

  • Complete the first lesson, it shouldn’t take more than 10-15min.
  • Say hi on the forum. The forum will be a great place for after school class discussion and for getting help from me and the other students.

Assessments/Differentiation:

Verify that evening that students have created an account.

Closure:     

 
Consolidation/Assessment of Learning:

View results of first quiz.

Feedback from Students:

Exit slip: Poll everywhere.

List one thing you would like to learn or do in physics.

Feedback to Students + Transition to Next Lessons

This first section is very short and mainly a review of science 10. We will use this time to practice getting into the swing of things and getting to know each other. I am excited to spend the next few days building our classroom together.

 

 Sponge activity (may be needed for this first class)

Instruct students on the difference between a vector and a scalar using the website materials as an example.

 

 

Final Reflection: The Flipped Classroom

For this final article, I choose a topic near to my heart. The flipped classroom. This article gives a full picture of a flipped classroom.

http://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2011/06/13/the-flipped-classroom-model-a-full-picture/

The basic idea of a flipped classroom is that the direct instruction portion of the class is given for homework, freeing up class time to help students master then content, do labs or other more time consuming and worthwhile projects. In the case of physics, which is my major, a student can have the time in class to get help where often at home it is above the parents ability.  Another advantage is the the pace of the theory is controlled by the student and often in their preferred learning style. If the student needs more time, they have it.

The main point of this article is to help prospective teachers use the extra class time effectively to maximuze learnign. The article describes a 4 stage cycle of a flipped classroom.

*Linked directly from original article.

 

The article mentions that the Experience sector is often the first point in the cycle. Students gain interested in topics because of their experience. The extra class time allows them to experience things the may not otherwise could.

Next comes concept exploration. Students can search for their own best content to help in their learning. This is where content rich sites and simulations comes into place

Next comes reflection. Students blog, create videos, and prove their understanding of concepts.

Going beyond reflection comes the application. Students reach the highest level of Blooms taxonomy by creating and applying what they have learned.

 

I believe that the flipped classroom holds one of the keys to successfully integrating technology into the classroom. It is no the be all and end all of strategies, but this method can provide the framework for increasing student learning and engagement. As quality content becomes more available, I can see this method becoming a standard practice in the school systems across North America.

WEEK 6: Technology Integration Strategies

This week’s article was the following youtube clip that instructed on assessment tools for technology integration

One of the main points of this presentation was to reinforce the importance of assessing not only the student work, but also assessing if the integrated technology has had a positive impact on teacher. The presentation gave several great examples that I believe apply not only to technology integration, but to every form of assessment. For example. when a student is learning how to multiply, a simple online multiple choice test may be sufficient. It can assess if the student is able to get the correct answers. On the other hand, a skill such as using a Microsoft Office product would need a very different form of assessment (such as a performance task).

The part of the presentation that was most helpful to me were the examples of good questions to assess the impact of the technology integration.

  • Is it safe for my students?
  • Was it used appropriately
  • Were the objectives reached
  • Were they engaged
  • Did they seem more interested?
  • How long/often did they use it?

Most of these assessment questions fall teacher observation, but there are other methods that can give some great formative feedback.

One of the simplest forms to verify success is the use of a checklist. Specify the proper criteria and check them off once they have been met. This doesn’t provide great detail into the depth of knowledge, but it allows a quick view to see if the minimum requirements have been met. Following checklists are Rating scales. They are exactly like a checklist, but ranked. A ratting scale may have a checklist that’s broken up as 1,2,3,4,5,  basic, intermediate, advanced, or anything else.

Finally the most detailed version would be the infamous rubric.  In a sense, it’s just a more detailed rating scale!

Even though the media quality of the presentation was mediocre, I believe that the content in it holds true and serves as a valuable reminder. As teachers, we need to constantly assess our own teaching, especially when it comes to the technology we integrate. As long as we realize that the traditional assessment tools are not a ‘one size fits all’, we can taylor different methods to suit our classroom needs.