Final Reflection: The Flipped Classroom

For this final article, I choose a topic near to my heart. The flipped classroom. This article gives a full picture of a flipped classroom.

http://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2011/06/13/the-flipped-classroom-model-a-full-picture/

The basic idea of a flipped classroom is that the direct instruction portion of the class is given for homework, freeing up class time to help students master then content, do labs or other more time consuming and worthwhile projects. In the case of physics, which is my major, a student can have the time in class to get help where often at home it is above the parents ability.  Another advantage is the the pace of the theory is controlled by the student and often in their preferred learning style. If the student needs more time, they have it.

The main point of this article is to help prospective teachers use the extra class time effectively to maximuze learnign. The article describes a 4 stage cycle of a flipped classroom.

*Linked directly from original article.

 

The article mentions that the Experience sector is often the first point in the cycle. Students gain interested in topics because of their experience. The extra class time allows them to experience things the may not otherwise could.

Next comes concept exploration. Students can search for their own best content to help in their learning. This is where content rich sites and simulations comes into place

Next comes reflection. Students blog, create videos, and prove their understanding of concepts.

Going beyond reflection comes the application. Students reach the highest level of Blooms taxonomy by creating and applying what they have learned.

 

I believe that the flipped classroom holds one of the keys to successfully integrating technology into the classroom. It is no the be all and end all of strategies, but this method can provide the framework for increasing student learning and engagement. As quality content becomes more available, I can see this method becoming a standard practice in the school systems across North America.

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